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 Post subject: Good Swamp Stories
PostPosted: March 15th, 2011, 5:16 pm 
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Jeff Holchin
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posted January 21, 2011 03:25 PM
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Cory and Ted's hog hunting thread with the swamp photos got me to thinking about how fun it is hunting swamps with all the creepy crawlies and scary things. If you got any, and I'm sure some of you do, please share. I'll start:

One year while living in the lowcountry of SC, I had a yankee friend from PA come down for some turkey hunting and we were in the swamps close to the Santee River in the Francis Marion NF. I knew there were gators around but didn't mention it to my skittish friend. Before dawn we heard a gobbler out in the swamp so we waded out in water up to our knees, easing past the huge old live oaks with the spanish moss hanging down and drifting fog. Soon I heard an old bull alligator sound off but didn't say anything. Five minutes later, he did it again only closer and louder, and my buddy asked "how did somebody with a jon boat and outboard motor get way back in here?". When I told him it was just a lovesick bull gator that must have heard us walking through the water, his eyes grew quite big and he did some high-stepping back to terra firma! I couldn't stop laughing.

Another time at Fort Stewart, right at prime time (dusk), I heard the most aweful sounding screaming and splashing from the nearby swamp, so I edged closer and closer with nocked arrow. It sounded like something was getting drowned or killed, and my imagination was working overtime as I drew near. You know the feeling - what little hair I had was standing on end, not knowing whether to investigate or not, wishing I had not left my pistol in the truck. Finally I saw it, or them - 3 big black male otters trying their darndest to mate with an obviously in-heat female otter.
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Plumbob
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posted January 21, 2011 03:50 PM
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I never considered myself skittish but............. I am with your buddy. I am not sure I am man enough to fend off a sexual assault by a gator. Unless the smell of poop turns him off.
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From: Sandpoint Id. | IP: Logged |

Terry Receveur

PBS Publicity Chairman
Member # 3

posted January 21, 2011 04:04 PM
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Great story Jeff!

A long time ago I took a buddy out wood duck hunting in some flooded timber in West Tennessee. We had to push many water moccassins out of the way to get to our spot before first light. While we were standing in thigh deep water a great blue heron let out his terdactyl like scream and tried to land on my buddies head thinking he was a stump. He screamed like a 10 year year old girl and threw everything in his hands right into the swamp. Was a bit skittish to begin with and the heron just put him over the edge. I only laughed for a little while...

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"Dad when can we go bear hunting?" - My 15 year old daughter Jennifer!

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Jeff Sample

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Member # 42

posted January 21, 2011 04:51 PM
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Jeff - Bill wasn't skittish before he started hunting with you!
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From: Hershey, PA | IP: Logged |

Jeff Sample

PBS Member
Member # 42

posted January 21, 2011 04:56 PM
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Terry - That the same swamp you took me to? I remember the cotton mouths swiming around us while we were standing in water up to our chests waiting for the sun to come up and the first flight of woodies. Good times!
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From: Hershey, PA | IP: Logged |

Terry Receveur

PBS Publicity Chairman
Member # 3

posted January 21, 2011 05:22 PM
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Jeff, you are correct! It was interesting wasn't it! That was a long time ago.

No it wasn't Jeff that screamed like a little girl!

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"Dad when can we go bear hunting?" - My 15 year old daughter Jennifer!

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From: Upstate NY | IP: Logged |

Terry Receveur

PBS Publicity Chairman
Member # 3

posted January 21, 2011 05:23 PM
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Jeff, I'm planning on the Harrisburg show on Monday the 7th. You around?

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"Dad when can we go bear hunting?" - My 15 year old daughter Jennifer!

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From: Upstate NY | IP: Logged |

Jeff Sample

PBS Member
Member # 42

posted January 21, 2011 05:29 PM
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That's good to hear - I thought it may have been me, and that I had supressed the memory!

Naw, I'll still be in TX on the 7th; get back late on the 8th.
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From: Hershey, PA | IP: Logged |

ethan
PBS Member
Member # 125

posted January 21, 2011 05:52 PM
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Terry, exactly where in West Tn were you hunting? I use to live and hunt there.
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From: cumberland plateau, tennessee | IP: Logged |

P.J. Petiniot
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Member # 24

posted January 21, 2011 06:06 PM
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I was duck hunting in southern Arkansas and we were hunting flooded timber on the second or third day on my hunt. I was hunting with two friends from up north and 4 local Arkansans--

We drove our boat through the Bayou at O dark 30 and eventually parked it-GOt out in the dark, wadded way back up in woolybugar country, in the dark, set up our decoys and proceeded to hunt when it was legal shooting hours.

Once the sun got up and we were calling and shooting a few ducks, I thought I noticed something in the dark water. Non de-script really, just movement here, a wake there.

This went on for a couple hours. We had shot quite a few ducks and the sun was now up that it was pretty bright under the canopy and I still was seeing unusual movement every now and then.

I wasn't freaked out or scared, just curious as to what was making all the commotion. I finally mentioned what I had been seeing to my host-

They said "It's probably snakes or muskrats" I said I see snakes and muskrats all the time, it's not that.

Then I was told "It's probably Nutria, you guys don't have nutria where you live and maybe you are seeing some of them"

I explained I have been in areas where Nutria live and I didn't think what I was seeing were nutria. I said "It's seems more stealthy. Like its sneaking around among us"

Then one of our host said "Probably a small gator"

I laughed and proclaimed "There aren't any gators in Arkansas" It was about this time that all 4 of our host erupted into uncontrollable laughter---

Now, I am standing in waist deep, brackish water with tree roots and cypress knees all around as tripping hazards ect.

I then state "I can't believe you A-holes brought me into a swamp, have me wading up to my chest in muck water and didn't tell me there are gators in here"

One of my host says "You never asked if there were gators in here"

Duh---

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The unspoken word is capital. We can invest it or we can squander it.
- Mark Twain's Notebook

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From: Indiana | IP: Logged |

David Kretschmar
PBS Member
Member # 1222

posted January 21, 2011 07:13 PM
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Gators, moccasins, teradactyls, in the swamp and muck,in the dark, and you guys want to know why I still live in the north, huh?

Holchin, if I was with you and you told me there was a gator around I would have cut your Achilles before I started running, just sayin'

David
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From: Somersworth, New Hampshire | IP: Logged |

Julian Tisdale
PBS Member
Member # 261

posted January 21, 2011 09:04 PM
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Ha. Jeff, you know the creepy crawly's are just part of the fun here in the SC lowcountry. I've hunted a lot of old rice field dikes for deer, hogs and ducks over the years...both in the Santee Delta and the ACE Basin. Surprising gators that then flush from under your feet is one that I can never get used to, but it just goes with the territory. They kind of explode and boy does it get your heart going. Good stuff.
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Terry Receveur

PBS Publicity Chairman
Member # 3

posted January 22, 2011 10:04 PM
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Ethan we were hunting just East of Memphis.

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"Dad when can we go bear hunting?" - My 15 year old daughter Jennifer!

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From: Upstate NY | IP: Logged |

Allen
PBS Member
Member # 178

posted January 27, 2011 03:09 PM
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All I know is that when it gets dark in the swamps it gets DARK!

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Try and be the person that your dog thinks you are...

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Jeff Holchin
PBS Member
Member # 37

posted January 28, 2011 09:19 AM
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When one of the better hunting units is actually called "Hellhole", you know it will be an interesting place to hunt.

Julian, you are right about those creepy crawlies: there were two types of poisonous spiders (brown recluse and black widows), scorpions, several types of rattlesnakes, copperheads, cottonmouths, and even a few very deadly coral snakes along the southern coast, gators, not to mention ticks, chiggers and no-see-ums. Probably leeches there too.

My favorite area was the Wambaw Creek area next to Archibald Rutledge's place along the Santee River - I killed deer, hogs and turkeys there. I am a big fan of Archibald and have some of his books about hunting the lowcountry. It was a thrill spending time in his old stomping grounds and thinking of all the history - one could almost feel the ghosts there. I visited several small coastal islands but never got to hunt them - wish I had a boat then. Ah....good times!
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 Post subject: Re: Good Swamp Stories
PostPosted: March 15th, 2011, 5:16 pm 
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Cory Mattson
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posted January 28, 2011 11:45 AM
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Jeff I am an Archibald Rutledge fan as well. His books make a great gift for anyone who owns land or spends serious time in low country South Carolina. Excellent writer - not sure he didn't get carried away on his gator hunt story - but ANYTHING can happen hunting gators - so maybe not.? Look forward to more stories - for me Most hunts are in a swamp.

Talk later - Thanks<><
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Julian Tisdale
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posted January 29, 2011 11:33 AM
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Holchin, I swear sometimes I think we were separated at birth.....

One of my most prized posessions is an autographed copy of Home By The River by AR. My great Aunt who was like a grandmother to me gave it to me as she was a public school librarion in SC for many years. I like lots of his work but this is THE book. I've spent some time around his place as well but most of my hunting is/was closer to the ocean side of the Santee delta. One of my good friends and hunting buddies was a game warden in the area and could get us on some private rice fields once duck season was over to chase hogs on the dikes. Nothing we ever got very good at but provided plenty of challenge and hair raising adventure. Here are some pics of the book.




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Julian Tisdale
PBS Member
Member # 261

posted January 29, 2011 11:39 AM
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Change gears a bit but still on topic...

A couple of weekends back some friends and I were killing time on some property near Bear Island in the ACE Basin. I was shooting armadillos with my bow and they snapped a few pics. Many times those critters will tote an arrow straight to their burrow. Well, one of my buds emails me a few pics the following week and points out what he thinks is a (fill in the blank here after looking at the pic)


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Bawana Bowman
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Member # 97

posted January 29, 2011 12:12 PM
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Lets see, would it be a rattler taking refuge under the dead fall and above the Burrow? Did you happen to retrieve the arrow and not notice the snake? Or did you leave it without seeing it? That is what I'm seeing isn't it?
I've been bitten enough times I'm starting to see them everywhere. Only 7 times over the past 35 years. Now I tend to watch for buzzworms, never use to worry about them.
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Julian Tisdale
PBS Member
Member # 261

posted January 29, 2011 01:52 PM
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Let's go with that...

Here's the next pic. Did somebody say creepy?


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Jeff Holchin
PBS Member
Member # 37

posted February 22, 2011 10:39 AM
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I just spent 3 days with my bow in the swamps of Georgia. Saw some hogs, deer, turkeys, a bobcat, a few gators, and a couple of these.....



I'm not real good on snake identification, just "good snake" and "bad snake" - I like to hold either one, but the later requires a bit more caution than the former. This snake first pretended to be a rare Georgia Cobra....



Then he pretended to be a cottonmouth...



but his round eyes indicated that he was pretty harmless...



and I got him to smile for the camera...



So cute and cuddly!
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bowhunter

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posted February 22, 2011 10:53 AM
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Puff adder. Big one too. If he was in the leaves he'd vibrate his tail and it would sound a little like a rattler. Dianne saw one last summer and swore it was a cobra.

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Dan

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Terry Receveur

PBS Publicity Chairman
Member # 3

posted February 22, 2011 11:56 AM
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You just had to pick it up by the tail didn't you?

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"Dad when can we go bear hunting?" - My 15 year old daughter Jennifer!

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From: Upstate NY | IP: Logged |

Plumbob
PBS Member
Member # 180

posted February 22, 2011 01:54 PM
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Holy Smokes!

Thats one bad looking dude.
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From: Sandpoint Id. | IP: Logged |

Kevin Dice
PBS Member
Member # 1160

posted February 22, 2011 04:56 PM
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Julian, that almost looks like a baby gator in that there hole. I was looking at a group of well camo'd baby gators one time, wondering what kinda snake it was, when they scattered, making my brain go HUH?
When mama started hissing and coming my way, I figured the rest out pretty quickly.
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Jeff Sample

PBS Member
Member # 42

posted February 22, 2011 05:12 PM
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Eastern hog-nosed snake? Think they're also called adder as well. You're still crazy Holchin!
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John Vargo
PBS Member
Member # 25

posted February 22, 2011 11:39 PM
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I think I just messed up a pretty good pair of underwear looking at those pics.
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Larry Schwartz

PBS Member
Member # 93

posted February 22, 2011 11:50 PM
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Yep, a hog nosed snake, also called a puff adder. You can tell by the upturned nose and their habit of flattening out when threatened, looking like a cobra. They will also puff themselves up with air to look bigger and more menacing. If you try to pick them up they will then let the air out and slip out of your grasp.

I worked as the field sports director at a Boy Scout camp the summer between my sophomore and junior years in college. After spending two days setting up an archery range I was going to set up the pole for the range flag and found an orange and brown snake right next to the range, it had one end coming out of a hole and its other end going into another hole a few inches away. Its coloration was just like a copperhead and I thought I would have to move the whole range. Then I realized that the coloration was reversed and figured out it was an Eastern Hog Nosed Snake.

The guy in charge of the nature lodge appreciated the donation and I kept my range where it was.
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Buck Rodgers
PBS Member
Member # 155

posted February 23, 2011 12:40 AM
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Some folks just aren't right, but they seem to fit in around here. Nice pics but I'm not a reptile fan at all.

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PBS campfires best place until we get to Heaven!!!!!!!!!!

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John3

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Member # 48

posted February 23, 2011 07:27 AM
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One morning years ago I set up on the ground in the dark in early November. Kicked the leaves out of the way and sat down. The sun came up and I happened to look down between my legs and oh yeah a Copperhead curled up between them...! I stayed pretty calm and slowly got up and found a more friendly place to bowhunt. I'm still glad this was a cool morning.

I don't like snakes at all. I leave them in peace and for sure would NOT be picking any of them up by the tail... LOL..!

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"There is no excellence in Archery without great labor".
Maurice Thompson 1879

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 Post subject: Re: Good Swamp Stories
PostPosted: March 15th, 2011, 5:17 pm 
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bowhunter

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posted February 23, 2011 07:47 AM
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Dianne cals me a snake hugger. I love 'em. I found a copper head near our house that must have been 3 ft long or better. Max is supposed to be 32". I thought briefly about turning her into limb backing but decided she was far too beautiful to be glued to my bow, so I let er slide. Dianne has killed 3 of her offspring since. She was one of nature's finest works and I just could not bring myself to defile it.

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Dan

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Biggie Hoffman

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posted February 23, 2011 11:18 AM
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Not as scary as a snake story, but a few years back I was hunting a spot at the Paradise in south Georgia that was as far off the dim road as you could get. No real problem but it was a longer walk than usual. There was no moon this night and I had to wait for some deer to move off before getting down so it ws black dark.
(Those of you who've hunted there, it was behind the hidden food plot all the way to the river).

Well as I started to get down I dropped my flashlight. It went out when it hit the ground.

If you've ever been in the swamp after dark, you know it's the darkest dark you have ever been in.
I stumbled out thru the cypress knees just guessing my direction. It was only a week or so after Cory's alligator incident.

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Life Member #25

"Eat, sleep, hunt........life is good!" Barry Wensel, 1988

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Jeff Holchin
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posted February 23, 2011 01:13 PM
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"It was only a week or so after Cory's alligator incident."

Somehow I missed that one - do tell, Cory!
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From: North Carolina | IP: Logged |

Jeff Holchin
PBS Member
Member # 37

posted February 23, 2011 03:10 PM
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Dan, I might have you beat regarding snakes. I live in a log cabin on a farm, so I have mice and rats to deal with. I have several "pet" snakes that are better than any cat, and more friendly, like this one that lives somewhere in the house...



He can be very friendly....



This snake lives out in the barn but gets a little greedy sometimes, especially when my hens are laying. He got carried away at the "all you can eat rat buffet" one night, as you can see....



I laid him up in the hay and he didn't move for a week!
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Jeff Holchin
PBS Member
Member # 37

posted February 23, 2011 03:16 PM
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I haven't met a snake yet that has really scared or threatened me, but then again I have not been to africa or australia where there are snakes that can and do try to kill a fella. My closest call was with a big diamondback that turned out to be a lot stronger than I expected - I grabbed him and quickly regretted the decision, but by then he had wrapped around my arm, was working hard to get his head loose from my grip, and I couldn't just toss him. I had to fight dirty and hold his head under water before he agreed to a truce. I now leave big diamondbacks alone.
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Jeff Sample

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Member # 42

posted February 23, 2011 05:11 PM
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Jeff, I remember you found a shed snake skin in the house when you bought the place. Obviously you never bothered to evict him. Does Diane know about your little pet? Tell me again why you're not divorced???
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Plumbob
PBS Member
Member # 180

posted February 23, 2011 07:34 PM
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When I was packing in the Salmon River breaks my buddy and I ate lots of rattle snakes, they were good and it was a change of pace.

I ran across one one day, lopped its head off and threw it in my saddle bags. When I got back to camp and discovered my dinner had jumped ship I relized then why my horse had set bucking for no apparent reason.

As the summer continued we kept rattlesnake on our menu until that fateful evening. I was preparing one for the skillet, when a nearly digested packrat flopped out...........SWEET MOMMA! That sucker stunk so bad it was the end of snake for dinner!
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John Vargo
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Member # 25

posted February 23, 2011 11:05 PM
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When I lived in NC and was a member of the Paradise hunt club in southern Georgia, I took my buddy Ben Graham down for a pig hunt. As we were hanging around camp, I noticed Joey's stuffed rattlesnake that he had picked up at a yard sale for a buck or two on the steps of the trailer he and Biggie shared. I probably shouldn't have, but decided to have some fun with Ben. I put the coiled, stuffed rattler on the ground and stood next to it. Ben came walking over after a few minutes to chat. I kept kicking my feet around trying to get Ben to look down and when he finally did his face turned whiter than white and in a low voice he says, "John don't move!" I couldn't stand it any longer and broke out laughing. Ben has really not been the same since then.
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Jeff Holchin
PBS Member
Member # 37

posted February 24, 2011 08:58 AM
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Jeff, after 20 years my wife just sighs and shakes her head at me sometimes - she hasn't been able to change me. She hates mice more than snakes so she tolerates Mr. no-shoulders in the house as long as he stays unseen.

Plumbob, that is too funny! Once a neighbor chopped off the head of a snake in my backyard before I could stop her, and a green tree frog crawled out!

John, that was not nice!

I'm starting to get an idea for a new PBS member hunt - let's head to the Florida Everglades for a snake round-up....

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldne ... lades.html
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Rick McGowan
PBS Member
Member # 56

posted February 24, 2011 11:58 AM
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I have jillions of swamp stories, really jillions. To follow up on biggies flashlight experience. Back when I lived in Michigan, we had one year where it just rained and rained from March right on to hunting season, everything was flooded, all the deer had dark brown lower legs from spending months walking in the tannic stained water, I had to buy knee high boots to walk to any of my stands. One pitch black, gloomy night I was walking out, following a "ridge" the ridge was the trail through the thick swamp that was shallow enough for my boots. I had a reflective tack trail, which was great until my flashlite went DARK, now several things, I did carry spare batteries, BUT this was the bulb AND even if I did carry a spare bulb, there was no way I could change it without any light and yes I did carry a lighter, BT you can't change a bulb AND hold the lighter on at the same time. NOW I always carry a spare light AND spare batteries. I can say, reflective tacks are a lot less useful without a flashlight. I managed to find my way to the road by the brail method(John Rook could have been my guide!)
Talking about the Paradise and snakes, one evening I was rushing down a path in a hurry to do something and watching for snakes, since there was a lot of gopher tortoise holes around, when I clearly saw a copperhead in the trail ahead(did I mention I was wearing tennis shoes?), then the snake disappeared like only a copperhead can do. I walked up bent over and stared at the spot, starting to doubt myself and then there THEY were, right where I saw them, a pair in flagrant delecto(sp). The male was good, he was ready for a nap, but the female apparently wasn't finished yet and really wanted to bite me. Anyway, the very next evening, it was almost totally dark and I was walking out and ROLLED a snake over with my foot, I could see its white belly in my periferal vison as I was launching myself vertically. It was the kind of snake that Sam calls a "rat snake" non-poisonous, but there is a fare resembleance to a copperhead, especially when its under your foot!
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bowhunter

PBS Member
Member # 164

posted February 24, 2011 12:39 PM
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Dianne and I were hunting hogs in Horse Creek Ga over on the Horse creek side of the WMA on one of our first dates. We headed out for a "quick" reconnoiter about 4 PM, sans day packs and ran into fresh hog sign in a big slough maze as the sun was setting. "A little farther" and "a little farther" and it's Biggie's kind of Paradise dark. Aside from our bows, the only gear we had between us was one old time mag light and it starts raining. It's Jan and in the 50s and we are in LS Ts. So we are taking turns "shooting azimuths" and we keep coming back to the same white sandy spot.... lap after lap after lap. In my head I kept waiting for her to turn into a "girl" or go psycho. We finally decided to head to high ground and get out of the sloughs so we could walk a semi straight line. It was all dead reckoning nav and high ground was the opposite way we needed to be heading, but eventually we hit a low ridge that ran us out to a WMA road and we hiked it quick time back to the truck. I don't know what time it was when we first started shivering, but we were well on our way to hypothermia when we got back to camp at 245 AM. If you’ve never been to Horse Creek, it’s over 8400 acres in the middle of Ocmulgee river, “dueling banjos” country.

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Dan

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bowhunter

PBS Member
Member # 164

posted February 24, 2011 12:44 PM
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"In my head I kept waiting for her to turn into a "girl" or go psycho".......

I wonder if she was thinking the same thing about me? Hmmmmm.

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Dan

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From: Md | IP: Logged |

bowhunter

PBS Member
Member # 164

posted February 24, 2011 12:56 PM
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You do have me beat Jeff. I might be a "snake hugger", but Dianne is the snake Terminator. If they come anywhere near our house they wind up hung on a limb for the birds to eat.
One of my Aussies loves to play with snakes. She gets right up nose to nose with them and when they strike she ducks ever so slightly to the side, like Ali dodging jabs. It's the funniest thing. the game ends when the snake gets tired and gives up.

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Dan

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D Means
PBS Member
Member # 307

posted February 24, 2011 01:07 PM
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Keep the stories coming folks. I am appreciating them as I may get to carry my bow through the swamps in a few weeks. Until now most of my swamp time has been during work. I was getting paid to be there but it was in a way that makes the swamp less than enjoyable.

In the meantime all I can share is a little mountain snake....


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D Means
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Member # 307

posted February 24, 2011 01:10 PM
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Dan, I think she knew how to get back to camp. She was just testing you a little. I guess you cleared the bar.
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 Post subject: Re: Good Swamp Stories
PostPosted: March 15th, 2011, 5:18 pm 
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bowhunter

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posted February 24, 2011 01:33 PM
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Duane. I would normally agree with your astute powers of observation, but she was pretty cold for a long time that night to be putting on an act. Nice picture, man. "Krakie mate!! Ain't she gloooreeuss?!?!"

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Dan

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Rick McGowan
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posted February 24, 2011 01:52 PM
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Oh I forgot to comment on the size of copperheads, I don't care what it says in books, the first one I ever saw in GA, was in the middle of the highway and I identified it at 60mph, it struck at my truck as I went by, since I figured it wasn't going to last long, I took it out myself and it was 43" long, I still have the skin to prove it!
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Jeff Holchin
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posted February 24, 2011 02:24 PM
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Rick and Biggie, you guys know Chris Ward, I'm sure. He has a thing for pretty cottonmouths and has posted some excellent photos of them on Tradgang - I'll try to find them. I've always found water mocaissains ugly and nasty, but not Chris.

Duane, nice photo! One glance and you know that snake can do damage, unlike the pussycat snakes I usually play with.

I enjoy hearing old timers talk about snakes and the myths and superstitions held by them.

One of my most interesting encounters happened in the mountains of the western part of Virginia, when I came upon several hillbillies with a burlap sack half full of timber rattlers, several which were P+Y size. I asked what they were gonna do with them, and they said sell them to a local church that still believes in snake handling.......
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From: North Carolina | IP: Logged |

D Means
PBS Member
Member # 307

posted February 24, 2011 02:46 PM
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Hey Jeff - thanks for the compliment on the photo. But please be nice when you're talkin' 'bout my neighbors. LOL

What about the bugs? How bad will the skeeters be in SW AL about mid-March? I used to refuse deep south swamp jobs after Feb. 15. Spent some time hip deep in GA swamps one February and was getting snow on Tuesday and skeeter bit on Wednesday. The three big boars that I stumbled into on Thursday were exciting as well. The Cape Fear region can be fun too. Does anyone know if a ThermaCell gadget works under water?
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From: Sinking Creek, Virginia | IP: Logged |

Jeff Holchin
PBS Member
Member # 37

posted February 24, 2011 03:04 PM
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No offense meant, Duane, regarding your neighbors. I was very tempted to attend one of those special services, but was too chicken. When I handle a snake, 'specially a poisonous one, I like a very firm grip right behind the head!

Skeeters are so big in Georgia that you need a migratory bird stamp to kill them....Those dang no-see-ums are worse than skeeters in the Cape Fear area, I think. For such a small thing, they sure bite BIG!
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From: North Carolina | IP: Logged |

Rick McGowan
PBS Member
Member # 56

posted February 24, 2011 04:00 PM
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Yeah the gnats in coastal GA are all teeth, dang things are nearly invisible, but bite like a pit bull!
I have to say, my favorite swamp was in an EXTREME remote area of Australia in the Northern Territory, it was so remote, I only got there a few times, if the vehicle broke down, it was a real possibility that it wouldn't be a roundtrip. I called it JURRASSIC SWAMP, I would not have been surprised to see a dinosaur walk out the jungle of weird giant fern/palm plants in fact I sort of expected it. I never saw a lot of those plants anywhere else and in fact the landowner tried to transplant some of them to the station, which was only 40-50 miles away and they all died. I have been there in the dry season and found HUNDREDS of water buffalo, only problem, its impossible to stalk that many buffalo and it always turned into being something that resembled a stampede!

[ February 24, 2011, 07:15 PM: Message edited by: Rick McGowan ]
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From: Georgia, USA | IP: Logged |

MarkU
PBS Member
Member # 148

posted February 24, 2011 09:50 PM
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I didn't think I had any swamp stories, but after reading through these, it reminded me that I have.

Years ago, on what probably was the very first Texas pig gig, Gene and Barry set up a hunt on the King Ranch. 1995 I think? Brent Poulter and I came down from Idaho, Dwayne Garner, Rich King and a few more come down from Montana, including Barry's eldest son. Doug Kerr showed up, as well as Jerry and Rick from Great Northern, and Eddie Burke, of "minor homicide" fame. Biggie and Cory were there. Rich and Joanne Unger cooked for us and put Biggie on his first diet. There were more, but I'd have to look at the pictures to remember.

They gave us maps of the area, and everyone left camp, driving in different directions to hunt. The map we had showed a lake, and Brent and I followed the dirt roads in our rented small car to where we figured we could get to the lake. As I recall, we found quite a bit of pig sign around the lake, which took about three hours to get around if you were in a hurry.

A day later, we took Dwayne along and got to the lake early, and spread some texas gold (corn) along a few trails on one end of the lake, and proceeded to hunt up the east shore. A whole herd of pigs jumped up from the reeds, and most went along the shore, with Brent and Dwayne in pursuit, but some tried to swim for it. It was only a couple hundred yards to the other side, so I took off after the swimmers, being the water was waste deep, and eventually caught up with six or so pigs before they got to the other side. The bigger ones acted hostile, so I grabbed a shoat by the hind legs and we went to shore, him swimming and me steering. Getting a foothold, he started the deliverance thing, squealing like a pig, but I had him by the back feet, and started to wheelborrow him along shore back to the car. He yelled the whole time until we hit the corn trail we had put out, then he just started to eat. I had to push him pretty hard to just get down the trail. Eventually I got tired of pushing him, so I got a rope out of my pack and tide him by a foot to a tree and let him feed on corn. Brent came by shortly, wondering about the squealing, and when he saw the rooter eating corn on the other side of the tree he walked over to look at it, whereupon it rushed over and bit him on the ankle. Talk about laughing. I finally let it go.

A couple of days later, we were hunting along the same lake, and I killed a yellow pig out in the reeds. Got it back to the car, and went back along the shore for a mile or so. When it was getting dark, I was cruising along a cattle trail in the tall brush when a big snake reared up in front of me. I jumped back, got an arrow on and shot it in the head at about three feet. It thrashed around in the extreme but I finally got hold of my arrow and drug it back to the car, while it thrashed and buzzed the 45 minutes or so until I finally cut its head off for good and it settled down. The snake was one of those rattlers that are about as thick as a fence post and six feet long. Still have the skin.

The weird thing about this hunt was that I clearly remember killing the yellow hog and the snake, but all the pictures show me with a second black hog. And I have the skin. But I have no recollection of ever having shot a second hog. None.

Evidently, and this could be used for scientific purposes, a snake scare erases short and long term memory.
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From: Idaho Falls, ID | IP: Logged |

Steve Hohensee

Administrator
Member # 44

posted February 25, 2011 12:38 AM
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That the biggest doosey I've ever heard U!
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From: Moose Pass, Alaska | IP: Logged |

bowhunter

PBS Member
Member # 164

posted February 25, 2011 09:54 AM
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Under the heading of "You know you're in red neck country when....." The first time we went to Horse Creek as we passed through the bump in the road they call Jacksonville Ga., Dianne starts laughing and points out the passenger window at a sheet of plywood propped up against a junk pickup truck. There in big black spray paint letters it said: WE BUY RATTLE SNAKES.

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Dan

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From: Md | IP: Logged |

bowhunter

PBS Member
Member # 164

posted February 25, 2011 09:58 AM
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Rickmc, I don't doubt ya for a minute. The one I saw was in that same class. When went home and ooked it up and it said 32" I figured they must be talking about Yankee copperheads or something.

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Dan

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From: Md | IP: Logged |

Jeff Holchin
PBS Member
Member # 37

posted February 25, 2011 10:32 AM
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U, when you said "The weird thing about this hunt was..." I was expecting the winner to be "but I had him by the back feet, and started to wheelborrow him along shore back to the car. He yelled the whole time until we hit the corn trail we had put out, then he just started to eat. I had to push him pretty hard to just get down the trail. "

I would love to see THAT on video.....
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From: North Carolina | IP: Logged |

Mark Baker

PBS Member
Member # 28

posted February 25, 2011 08:25 PM
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My own experiences at Paradise, with famous (or infamous) hog guide Matt Shuster yeilded few snakes, though I was told we probably walked "over" a half dozen. Perhaps he was just joshing me.....but the creepiest thing or things I encountered were these BIG spiders. They had webs that spanned 10 or 15 feet at times between trees, and seemed to like "head high" altitudes. Good thing they did'nt bite, as we seemed to run into them every few yards. They would just crawl off.






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From: Livingston, Montana | IP: Logged |

Buck Rodgers
PBS Member
Member # 155

posted February 25, 2011 09:01 PM
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I wouldn't fare well with those big spiders bitters or not!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
See you tomorrow Mark, Terry Bowling

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PBS campfires best place until we get to Heaven!!!!!!!!!!

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From: Indiana | IP: Logged |

Rick McGowan
PBS Member
Member # 56

posted February 26, 2011 08:57 AM
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Those are golden orb spiders, I have photos of some P&Y sized ones myself. It takes to about December here before you can walk through the swamp without getting a face full of spider webs on every step. On the bright side, if you are a spider collector, all it takes is a short walk through the swamp and then you can just pick the ones you want out of your hair! Of course Shooster dosn't have that problem!
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From: Georgia, USA | IP: Logged |

Mark Baker

PBS Member
Member # 28

posted February 26, 2011 11:58 PM
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Thanks Rick....was wondering what they were called. Now I know. There sure was a bunch of them things.
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From: Livingston, Montana | IP: Logged |


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