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 Post subject: You Eat What You Kill
PostPosted: March 29th, 2015, 5:45 am 
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I assume that basically all of us eat what we kill, with the exception of certain species taken primarily as varmints. When I've got it, wild game and fish makes up a large percentage of what we eat here. So this is leading to a related topic of sustenance and self-sufficiency:

Does the rest of your yearly diet come from the land / local markets or big grocery store? Do you grow a garden or veggies of any size? Do you or your spouse can/preserve meat, fish, veggies or fruit? Freeze and preserve? Do you own a vacuum sealer, grinder, pressure canner, etc? What about wild berries, fruits, nuts and mushrooms? Is a farm market or locally-grown co-op available and do you use it? Fruits trees on your land? Do you fish specifically to stock your freezer with wild fish?

Or are you one of those people/families who seems to find it's just easier to shell out the money at Costco or Giant Eagle...name your massive grocery store. Perhaps you're on the organic trail and hitting Whole Foods or other pricey retail grocers.

I/We do: Can some stuff. Pick wild berries. Visit berry farms and orchards to pick our own. Grow a small amount of vegetables. Support our local produce farmers who sell at their farms. Hit farm markets steadily in season. Try to keep some fish in the freezer year around. We sometimes buy brown eggs from friends who have free-range chickens, and we've been getting some local pork also. Thinking about getting a vacuum sealer. Still spend way too much money (I think) at the chain grocery store, and wish we could do better.

You?


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PostPosted: March 29th, 2015, 7:15 am 
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I DONT buy red meat. I've been trying to eat a bit more chicken and fish, so I do buy that. I try to only eat organic vegetables - not sure that this really matters but it's important to my wife, so I do it. We do have local farm co-ops and we do two of them. They are awesome and I highly recommend. You never know exactly what you will get, but that's part of the fun. You meet nice people; we've got to know some of the farmers. The family looks forward to the weekly pick ups. We typically have a small garden of our own - usually pretty much just keep us stocked up on zucchini, tomatoes, and peppers.

... My wife does do most of her shopping at trader joes and whole foods. Again, I DO believe in eating unprocessed foods, I don't know how important organic really is, but she believes in it. I figure I spend more money than I need to on hunting stuff, so NP if she wants to spend more at these top shelf grocery stores.

... What else ... All eggs from the lady down the road. Fresh eggs are the way to go and a great way to touch base with the neighbors. We eat a lot of eggs.

... Yes on the grinder .... Love my big old cabelas grinder - eats through meat at an amazing rate. Do occassionally can, but haven't done so in awhile.

I'm definitely NOT living off the land, but I will say that I feel MUCH healthier when I pay close attention to eating unprocessed foods, meat that I kill/process/cook, and little or no sugar that doesn't come from from fruit. It has made me more fit, I believe that there is a positive impact on cognitive functioning, I sleep better, and several healthcare professionals have explained the long term health and cancer preventative benefits to this lifestyle.

... We should all be doing this. We are the few in our society who possess the skillset and motivation to make sure our families only eat the healthiest possible meat available. My family of 5 needs about 8-10 deer per year - which gets supplemented with whatever else I happen upon - turkeys, elk, hogs, whatever.

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PostPosted: March 29th, 2015, 7:38 am 
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Interesting post Kevin.

I wish I could say that I supported my family and our diets without the weekly trips to the big boxes but it surely isn't the case. We do get a good bit of venison and some fish, oysters, crabs etc with our bare hands each year but fruits and vegetables not so much. We are actually getting some chickens this week, though! At the end of the day, we have a city/suburb life and can't grow our own and don't go to the extent we should to support the fresh food networks that are trying create better food options. At least this issue continues to gain awareness, though.

That being said, I do keep my diet to the whole/natural food realm for the most part. It's harder to keep the family on that track, though.
This morning I'll have a shake that is one whole avocado, a handful of frozen berries, scoop of chia seeds, a plop of plain yogurt, and a little bit of milk. For lunch I'll probably have some sliced turkey and a sweet potato. Will snack on fruit and nuts during the day and for supper I'll have whatever the family is having. Usually the typical protein dish with a couple of sides.

I realize that my choices, though, healthy for me as I strive for a clean diet with high nutrient variety, is coming at a big cost to the environment. The carbon footprint on my morning shake is probably larger than half the countries of the world produce. I plan on positioning myself for different scenario ten years from now.

One interesting tangent on this topic...
I read a book a few months ago that got into the discussion of prehistoric diets, nutrition etc. One theory is that since most of our ancestors had to fill most of their dietary needs with animals, only by utilizing the entire animal were they able to get the nutrients needed to survive. Since there's bio-accumulation of nutrients in intestines, brain, liver etc, those are probably more valuable to us than the lean meats we use from our animals today.

So....to the point of your post....I should be eating deer brain this morning instead of my hipsteryogaveganyuppie shake! :mrgreen:


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PostPosted: March 29th, 2015, 8:05 am 
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Interesting topic Kevin. I try and provide all I can. Yesterday I finished preparing the garden. We grow a small amount of the things we like to eat. Especially lots of tomatos. I went to may favorite Morel mushroom spot and its a bit early here. The old timers say "When the redbuds are abloom, and the blackjack oak leave is that of a squirrel ear, the morels will appear". Well the redbuds are in bloom but the blackjacks are just unwrapping.

We stock self grown grass fed beef in the freezer. We grow them out on our property and custom butcher. We keep wild caught fish (crappie) and eat free range chicken.

We do shop at Whole Foods and its certainly pricey. We do mostly organic eating. We no longer own a microwave and all the Teflon pans were thrown out years ago and replaced with cast iron.

We process our own whitetails. We implement a heavy grinder and freeze all thing into vacuum sealed bags.

I planted two peach trees yesterday. Should have started with fruit trees many years ago.


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PostPosted: March 29th, 2015, 10:11 am 
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I eat all that I shoot...

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One day I'll get to where I process all my own meat, but until then I will rely on my good friend who happens to be a butcher by trade.

Personally, I have even gone as far as trying porqupine, ground hog and coon. Neither appealed to me, but I can say I've tried.

My boys have no problem eating whatever I put in front of them, but mi y wife on the other hand is a little harder to please (Thank you Ted for the venison and green Apple recipe. We all Enjoyed it).


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PostPosted: March 29th, 2015, 10:54 pm 
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I will be the first to admit that I don't eat everything I kill. Small game, not all Rabbits, possums, only some goats, some pigs and a couple of deer I have left.
Most of my veges are coming from our vege garden with plans to put in a tunnel house.
All meat lamb and wild game I kill and cut up. Beef is done my a butcher which is a mate of mine. All lamb and beef are grass fed and raised by the family. Grass feeding is pretty standard down here.
The one main meat we buy is chicken.
I like to know EXCATLY what animal I'm eating. Young animals are better.
Most fish and duck are off the table. I have a fussy mrs.
However I eat them so usually there is some of it in the freezer.
I have eaten grain feed beef once in HI. NEVER again!
Fruit and berries I usually pick when in season from roadside apple trees or in the bush. Eg black berries, snow peas ect.

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PostPosted: March 30th, 2015, 5:39 am 
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In our basement we have 2 dedicated freezers and a refrigerator/freezer. We keep a lot of frozen meat, fish, berries, fruit and vegetables. We're pretty fortunate to live in an area where many Amish families grow and sell produce for local marketing. This gives us an incredible choice of fresh-picked veggies and fruit throughout the warm season. Our area is also seeing some development of beef farms which raise and custom-butcher beef to order. With the nearest Whole Foods being 2 hours away, we basically never get the chance to shop the organic markets. We're still eating pretty 'clean' food however.

I've been thinking about a vacuum sealer but haven't made the commitment yet. I like the thoughts of continuing to source local and natural foods, and then saving or preserving them for later consumption. This isn't all driven by health concerns in our case. It's more of a 'better choices and better eating' lifestyle. I know plenty of people who get probably 98% of their yearly groceries at Walmart or other chain stores, and there's no way I would ever see us going down that road.


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PostPosted: March 30th, 2015, 8:24 am 
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Is it just me or do you notice how expensive the farmer's markets are these days? I remember when you went to the farmer's market to get your produce cheaper than the grocery stores. We commonly stop at farmer's markets but rarely do I see a "good buy" with regards to price. We grow a few things in my garden at my hunting property but can't grow stuff that needs to be picked every few days as we only get down there once every two-three weekends during summer.


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PostPosted: March 30th, 2015, 8:40 am 
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I believe people at the Farmer's Markets are cashing in on the latest craze to eat healthier. If anything, as long as the demand stays there, the larger producers that supply the grocery stores will eventually have to follow along and provide a "healthier" alternative to the tasteless produce that is currently offered.

Yes, we pay more at the local markets, but in our own little way, we are helping our community.

On a side note...has anyone seen the size of the chicken breasts offered by Sam's Club? I'm not the grocery shopper in our home, but one day I joined my wife at Sam's and when I walked thru the meat department, I noticed the chicken breasts were as large, or larger, than "Normal" Turkey breasts. I immediately got to thinking about what in the world could of been either feed to, or injected into, those chickens to get them so huge.

Our membership to Sam's was approaching, and because of that incident, we did not renew and chose to sign up with Costco instead. We have other reasons for making the switch (pays better wages, has better benefits for employees, friendlier staff, etc.), but the main one is I just couldn't get over the chicken I saw at Sam's.


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PostPosted: March 30th, 2015, 9:00 am 
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Kevin, this is certainly an interesting topic. However, going all natural has a lot to do with wear you happen to located. For instance, growing your own produce is not much of a stretch in the Midwest and South. Give it a try in the plains or mountain states. There's a reason the number of indigenous trees can be counted on two hands in South Dakota (It is a bit more temperate in the Black Hills.) The weather is dry, windy and extended winters. Fruit trees and gardens don't manage very well in this part of the world.
Protein is a little bit easier to acquire in the way of meat and fish.

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PostPosted: March 30th, 2015, 9:24 am 
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We have raised our own meat chickens and pigs and have broke even on them.
I tell everyone our eggs are about $12.50 per doz. LOL (cost of chicks,few die,chicken coop,fence,sons dog got a couple and hawks are really hard on them etc..)
Raised bed gardens I put in with special soil, bought larch wood for the beds 24" high etc etc..
I doubt we save a nickle but we have a clue what we eat.
As far as game meat we eat, we all know we do not want to tally that cost up.LOL
Yes we eat most that we shoot going to learn about woodchucks this year.


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PostPosted: March 30th, 2015, 5:20 pm 
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Good discusion! I've never really thought about it but I guess my food comes from a combination of most of the methods you mention Kevin. I do own a grinder and vacuum sealer and process all my own elk & deer. That makes up probably 95% of my families red meat consumption. The only red meat I purchase is the occasional steak.

About the only fishing I do is for trout so I'll keep a few of those to eat throughout the year. My brother is a a big fisherman so he gives me plenty of other fish to last me. Occasionaly I'll buy some Salmon but that's about it.

We grow a small garden and my wife has just started getting into canning but it certainly isn't of enough quantity to get us through the year.

My wife works with a lady who's 12yr old son raises laying hens and has bee hives. It's a good way for us to get organic eggs and honey and I feel good supporting a kid with good work ethics at such a young age.

We buy as much of the balance of our groceries as we can at either Whole Foods or Fresh Market but also rely some on the big chain grocery store. No matter what grocery store we shop at, we try to only shop the perimenter (perishables). The only time I venture into the center of the store is for coffee.


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PostPosted: March 30th, 2015, 6:57 pm 
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My kids think beef tastes funny! We eat all we kill. Deer is the mainstay. We enjoy the gator and other exotic meats. I do all my own butchering and have a big industrial strength grinder and a vacuum sealer. I fish a lot and keep a few. We brought home about 90#s of cod, haddock, pollack, and cusk from a trip this past year. We make our own crabapple jelly and Tina can's some tomatoes. We have some laying hens that provide all the eggs we need. Tina's hens were all eaten last fall so we have 8 new chicks right now.

Still buy most of our veggies. I hope to some day have more property to put in a big garden.


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PostPosted: March 30th, 2015, 7:23 pm 
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One of my favorite organic foods. Wild Morel mushrooms! Found these today along the mighty Cimarron river. I love the fact that most of us are gatherers as well as hunters.
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PostPosted: March 30th, 2015, 7:49 pm 
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A couple things as I read through ...

Yes, we pay more for food because of the way we eat. Farmers market are more expensive than they used to be. But we also find good deals because we build relationships with the people we get our food from. Whether it is the woman at the co-op throwing my kids a few free cookies or our egg supplier giving me a jar or two of local honey in the spring because I mentioned I think it helps my allergies, it makes things even out a bit - especially because it is healthier and we make these relationships which is good.

Groundhogs - saw them mentioned twice - don't knock em till you really make an effort. Young ones cooked in a crock pot --- not bad at all!!

Kevin - get the vacuum sealer. No reason not to. They aren't particularly expensive, food savers are a good brand, last forever, the rolls can be purchased anywhere. Meat lasts way longer. I don't know how I would process my own deer without my foods saver.

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PostPosted: March 30th, 2015, 7:51 pm 
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.... And Preston, your morels look awesome!!! I always look and never find them. I'm jealous!

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PostPosted: March 30th, 2015, 7:55 pm 
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Preston, I forgot all about Morel mushrooms. To get my boys more motivated in to outdoors and promote good work ethic, I offer them $0.25 for each Morel they find. Here is a pretty good haul for them...

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I've also tried to instill fishing skills for both summer and winter into them. I think they are off to a good start...

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Then there is the ever present sibling rivalry. To watch one kid dare another can sometimes bring a LOT of laughter...

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I know we are a Bowhunting organization, but this thread is all about ways that we "Live off the land". Sorry for all the fishing pictures guys, but as long as I keep doing this with my boys at this age, they will not only be productive members of society, but be able to grow their abilities and love for the outdoors.


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PostPosted: March 30th, 2015, 11:15 pm 
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My wife and I do a little of everything, though we try to buy organic if we're at a chain grocery store. We belong to a local CSA (Community Sponsored Agriculture) farm which gives us vegetables every week beginning in the early summer through the fall. I'm actually better about buying grass fed or organic meat than she is, but I'm always hoping to move from greenhorn to adequate hunter to provide our meat. I just got a deep freezer for the basement, and so far have three trout that my son caught at the sportsman show and a store bought turkey to show for it. Hope to do better soon.

We also have two 6' X 2' raised beds that we grow some of our own vegetables in, and I planted a fig tree a few years ago that should start producing edible fruit in the next year or two. Can't wait.

I have canned my own marinara from my own tomatoes in the past, but haven't in some time. I'll have to get back to it.

And I don't mind paying more for healthier fare because I figure the more people that are willing to do so, the lower the price should eventually become, right?

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PostPosted: March 31st, 2015, 1:18 am 
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I usually eat what I kill. Sense I've lived in Alaska I've had to buy more meat than I have ever have. A lot of hunting but not much killing Lol.

Keven if you buy a vac sealer go with a commercial rated, chambered style sealer. It will cost you some money but it will out last a food saver and your food will last a lot longer in the freezer. Ive used a food saver for years and never have been happy with it. I now take all my fish to a commercial processor to get vac sealed. With the food saver i was lucky to get 9 months out of my fish before 75% was freezer burnt. Now that I take it in to a processor to get sealed 95% will be as good as when I put it in the freezer 2 years later.

My opinion about "organic" is it is a big marketing scam. Ive done a great deal of research on it and I see nothing but a big scam. Organic farms produce 1/3 less yields so they have to make up the revenue some way so they use scare tactics so people think organic is healthier. If it makes you feel like your doing good things by buying it keep doing it, but not in this house.


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PostPosted: March 31st, 2015, 6:38 am 
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You guys are impressive!

I definitely think the higher prices in farm markets relates to the organic shift we're seeing. The very best farm market I know about is located in Athens, OH and when we go there we DO NOT save a penny in all likelihood. Some of the offerings are very pricey and border on ridiculous. However, it's great to see vendors showing beautiful peaches, squash, beans, kale, pears, blueberries, all manner of garden veggies, etc. Some of these people I would call boutique growers. They're hobbyists as much as anything and enjoy making a buck from doing it. We enjoy the village atmosphere and supporting these folks who are very definitely the antithesis of a Sam's Club.

Other things we dig: Local beef and pork, craft cheese and dairy, honey and eggs. Even our neighbor is getting into the act. They are producing beef, pork, goats, chickens, eggs and such...using non-GMO feed and mainly grass.

Thought: The most effective weight loss diet I ever discovered is based on an all-you-can-find-and-eat morel plan.... It works for me.

Ted and Olin...I'm going to look very hard at vacuum units. I plan to buy one good unit and make it go the distance. I can't stand freezer burn and will definitely be looking to head that off. Thanks for motivating me.

A memory: My daughter was still quite young and used to ride with me in my Jeep CJ-5. We'd go door-less and just a bikini-top on the Jeep...taking rides through the backroads. She got pretty good at spotting ripe wild raspberries and having me pick some for her. I would jump out and get a big handful (or more) and then she would eat them as we bounced along. "You're living the good life kiddo!" She would grin and say "Uhh-HUH!" A couple years ago she sent me a picture. She found a patch of wild raspberries growing in urban Rockford, IL and picked enough for a pie. She still prefers wild game meat and loves to garden. It makes me smile, too.

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PostPosted: March 31st, 2015, 7:22 am 
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Here is a tip that I have only shared with a select few about finding Morel mushrooms (just so happens, those FEW are also PBS members)...

Where I work, they take beauty of the property (1500+ acres) to Extreams. There are literally hundreds of flower beds here. What, besides flowers, is common in flower beds? Mulch. Where do you typically find morel mushrooms? Near dead or decaying trees. What is mulch? You guessed it.

I have found more morels in the flower beds here at work and also at MANY local businesses than I care to admit, and ALMOST feel guilty about it. Probably 75% of the morels I find, I give to a friend of mine, who is a Chef, and he also puts on a great wild game luncheon here at work for a few us that hunt or fish. I figure it's a pretty good tradeoff.

With that tip, it will not only help you locate the delicious morsels, but also get you some exercise by getting you out and walking and working on your "Bend overs". Remember, you only get so many Bend-overs in a day, so use them wisely.


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PostPosted: March 31st, 2015, 7:30 pm 
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I don't mean to undermine Mr Kenny's opinion about the food saver. A lot of people use and are happy with them. I've just haven't had much luck with them. I've used mine mostly for sealing salmon. I don't remove the pin bones on the fillets and that was part of the problem. The bags needed to be a heaverier mill plastic. With The commercial grade you can get a heavier bags that gives you a better product Imo.


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PostPosted: March 31st, 2015, 7:54 pm 
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First Olin, if you ever call me "Mr." Again, then we got problems brother.

... No concern about the foodsaver. I like mine. I burned through my first one after about five years. The current one is three years old with no noticeable reduction in quality. I make it a point to eat my stuff within a year - not because of freezer burn but because I enjoy refilling the freezers. To this end, I give meat away in august when there is extra and I don't see what condition it's in after two years. I will say the foodsaver keeps it perfect for at least 12 months. No doubt a commercial sealer is better; but the foodsaver sure is easier, cheaper, and more convenient. Pros and cons both ways.

Re: organic - I've done some research too; I don't really buy into organic vegetables. With you on that Olin. BUT my wife does. Fought that battle once - not gonna fight it again. Organic isn't going to hurt me, after all. My wife is a little nutty about stuff - she also will only talk on her cell phone on speaker phone - drives me freaking nuts!!!

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PostPosted: April 1st, 2015, 3:10 am 
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Ken, sorry for the Mr. Just trying to be respectful.


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PostPosted: April 1st, 2015, 6:46 am 
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This thing about eating well and respecting one's body enough to avoid junk...when possible...seems to carry over and into other places/activities. When we go to Molokai one of our MOST favorite things is to visit Kumu Farms and buy a serious load of local fruit and vegetables grown on the island. Papaya, apple bananas, lilikoi (passion fruit), mango, pineapple...and superb vegetables. Locally made pesto is a favorite. Molokai Ranch raises grass-only beef and a local co-op handles the slaughtering. We go there to buy filets, roasts and grill-meat. The town of Kaunakakai has a farmer's market on the sidewalks every weekend...amazing selection.

When we take road trips we are always on the lookout for growers. Places like orchards, vineyards, produce farms, markets, and such always get us to stop. It's typical for us to be well-stocked with fresh stuff as we travel, and we eat on this instead of stopping for a snack cake or Mc-burger. You can definitely enjoy the taste of eating healthy...I know we do.


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PostPosted: April 1st, 2015, 9:05 am 
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Eating healthy foods on a regular basis is far more important than exposing yourself to minute quantities of pesticides that may be present in "non-organic" foods. I am a chemist and researcher by trade and do a lot of work associated with pesticides and foods. I don't buy "organic" foods because they are: (1) priced much higher, (2) less desirable in appearance and size (in general). If you want to reduce your exposure to pesticides in food, I suggest trying to avoid imported foods from countries which have lax food safety laws (China, Vietnam, South America, Mexico, etc.). Organic does not equate to "pesticide-free." "Organic" foods can have low levels of pesticides due to spray drift from nearby fields where pesticides are used and by growing "organic" foods in fields where pesticides were used in the past and still linger in the soil. One other secret, bottled water tends to be a hoax. Your chlorinated tap water is just as pure as any of the bottled water products that have pictures of mountains and pristine streams on the label. In fact, one of the largest bottlers of water uses tap water from a large municipal city and passes the water through a few charcoal filters to removes odors and tastes.


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PostPosted: April 2nd, 2015, 2:01 am 
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Love this thread! Great pictures from both Kevin Dill, and Mike Vines, they should be displayed at St. Augustine.
Dawn and I raise and can about 75 percent of our garden produce, in fact we were in the garden this afternoon planning the busy season about to start. One of the fringe benefits of all this good healthy eating is the money we save. As I'm fond of saying, "growing your own food is like printing your own money".
One thing I'm sure most PBSer's can relate to is the growing activity of foraging. Beware this simple pastime-it can become all consuming! I spend a good portion of the warm months these days eating the weeds. ;) . I mean, if they're on my plate, they're not really weeds, right? Get a good guide book or two, I can't recommend the Sam Thayer books highly enough.
Along that vein, take a look at some of the "other" mushrooms. Morels are the gold standard, delicious and easy to identify, but also look into Maitakes, Sulphur Shelf, various Oysters and Chanterelles. My mushroom season easily runs 6-8 months now, in fact I found one Maitake, or hen-of-the-woods that weighed around 25 pounds. First mushroom I wished I had a deer cart for!
The usual cautions apply for identifying fungus, of course. Several of the above have no look-a-likes, which makes ID more assured.

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We seek the forest for adventure and a free, open-air hunter's life, for a time at least. G W Sears "Nessmuk" 1892


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PostPosted: April 2nd, 2015, 2:01 am 
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Love this thread! Great pictures from both Kevin Dill, and Mike Vines, they should be displayed at St. Augustine.
Dawn and I raise and can about 75 percent of our garden produce, in fact we were in the garden this afternoon planning the busy season about to start. One of the fringe benefits of all this good healthy eating is the money we save. As I'm fond of saying, "growing your own food is like printing your own money".
One thing I'm sure most PBSer's can relate to is the growing activity of foraging. Beware this simple pastime-it can become all consuming! I spend a good portion of the warm months these days eating the weeds. ;) . I mean, if they're on my plate, they're not really weeds, right? Get a good guide book or two, I can't recommend the Sam Thayer books highly enough.
Along that vein, take a look at some of the "other" mushrooms. Morels are the gold standard, delicious and easy to identify, but also look into Maitakes, Sulphur Shelf, various Oysters and Chanterelles. My mushroom season easily runs 6-8 months now, in fact I found one Maitake, or hen-of-the-woods that weighed around 25 pounds. First mushroom I wished I had a deer cart for!
The usual cautions apply for identifying fungus, of course. Several of the above have no look-a-likes, which makes ID more assured.

_________________
We seek the forest for adventure and a free, open-air hunter's life, for a time at least. G W Sears "Nessmuk" 1892


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PostPosted: April 2nd, 2015, 10:55 am 
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I knew if he found this that Kevin (Dice) would be helpless to resist a worthy contribution. I think when the only wild animal left is a coyote, the only thing thriftier at finding nourishment from the environment will be Diceman. Trust me...I've seen what he and Dawn grow, make and preserve. I've eaten some of it too (thanks for the big jar of pickles!) and it is delicious. Campfire cooking is his specialty...there is nobody better.

Hey JV...I don't buy bottled water either. What a waste of money. I just go to Alaska and drink up...

:idea: Speaking of drinking up and saving money, we haven't even touched on homemade beverages....


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PostPosted: April 2nd, 2015, 11:06 am 
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Kevin's opening statement. "You eat what you kill" lies at the very heart of who we are as PBS'ers. I think it is safe to say most of us would love to shoot something with big antlers on a yearly basis. But the fact of the matter is if we are not hunting to feed ourselves we may be hunting for the wrong reason. Hunting for photo ops, headmounts, rugs, as the primary reason is not a reason to hunt. If it is a by-product of a successful hunt or the end goal of filling the freezer then great!
I have been fortunate to live in an area where access to good elk hunting has allowed me to raise 3 kids on wild meat as part of there primary diet. They are all grown and married now but the benefit was them eating healthy and knowing exacting where their meat comes from. A huge disconnect with modern society.We also have fruit trees and garden to help with the supply of fruits and vegetables. The local deer and bear population thinks they are part owners in my fruit trees come as well.


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