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PostPosted: December 22nd, 2014, 10:39 am 
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So most everyone knows the basics of making your hunting bow quiet. Things like padding your string loops, cat whiskers, puff balls (string silencers) and getting the sweet spot on brace height, but what else do you do to deaden that twang on the shot?

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PostPosted: December 22nd, 2014, 10:43 am 
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Wood arrows are quieter from my Longbow compared to other arrow shaft material.


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PostPosted: December 22nd, 2014, 10:49 am 
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If don't have a problem with it, I've found a bow mounted quiver. Especially a strap on will dampen avibration quite a bit. I actually shoot a little better with one on.


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PostPosted: December 22nd, 2014, 10:50 am 
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And a heavier arrow....


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PostPosted: December 22nd, 2014, 11:54 am 
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Several times I have glanced over at my bow and said to myself "I forgot to add string silencers"...I would then go back to gutting the deer I had just killed and forget to put string silencers on my bow.


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PostPosted: December 22nd, 2014, 9:37 pm 
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When I first learned to make Flemish twist strings I decided to make a three bundle string for my recurve. At the time I was shooting an 82 Lb Schafer Silvertip ay my 31 inch draw.......Yes 82 Lbs......I shot it a lot too.....(younger stronger....dumber).

Anyway, that three bundle string was made from B-50 yet that bow made the loudest string slap sound when I shot it with that string. The two bundle string was noticeably quieter. I had even taken the silencers off to see how loud the two bundle string really was.

The problem is the hardness of the string in the twisted splice. Three bundles made it more round and that resulted in bad string slap.

That got me thinking. I made a new string with two bundles but this time I deliberately twisted the splice lightly for the first three inches or so then as I got towards the end of the splice I twisted very tight to finish it off.

The results were impressive even against the other double bundle string. The softness of the splice took all the string slap out of it. I had no issues with the splice and since then on all the bows I've built I've always been careful not to over twist the spliced portion of the string.

When I switched to fast flight materials I use a total of 8 strands of B50 long enough to blend into each splice and string loop. I still do the light twist in the splice as before. I get extra bearing surface and cushion in the string loops and against the string grooves on the limb.

I'm convinced that starting with a good sounding bare string is the first step. You should never need pads on a limb to quiet string slap....Don't treat the symptom cure the disease. A good sounding bare string should be followed by a reasonable arrow weight. Then bare shaft tuning to find the correct spine for flight, and the lowest brace height that still allows the bow to be quiet. Then put on what ever string silencer you want.

There shouldn't be that much left to dampen. I like cat whiskers because they're easy to install and replace in the field. They don't pick up burrs, water don't effect them and they just plain work. I split them in half because I don't need that much.

That's what works for me and I shoot 70Lbs at a 31" draw...That's a lot of vibration to dampen!


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PostPosted: December 22nd, 2014, 9:59 pm 
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heavy wood arrows.....after finding sweet spot on brace height...and if needed cat whiskers or beaver balls...and sometimes even if I dont need them will add them...I just like how they look. :)

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PostPosted: December 23rd, 2014, 8:10 am 
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I don't really worry about my bow making some noise. I just try to follow principles which reduce much of it without forcing me to get headaches searching for a 1/2% improvement. Good string, good tune, heavy arrow, string silencers (I favor wool) and it ends there for me. I've concluded that no bow can be silenced enough that a whitetail or elk or bear cannot hear the shot. It's about muffling things down to an acceptable level that doesn't produce a panic reaction.


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PostPosted: December 23rd, 2014, 9:46 am 
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So Kevin, if I am hearing you right you add extra B50 string just to the string loops and the first few inches of the FF string. So basically you have a 12 or 14 strand string for about the first 6-8 inches on each end correct?

I have my hunting arrow up to 620 gr. I would love to get it to 700+, but have not been able to find heavy enough wood shafts and I hate adding weight tubes inside of carbon shafts. I've been using 175 gr. Woodsman heads for the past few years, before that I was using the 125's and used 100 gr brass insert. What do you gents do to get heavy arrows?

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PostPosted: December 23rd, 2014, 8:52 pm 
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Rob,
I think you might be asking me about the extra strands of B50?

First off, I find that 16 to 18 strands of fast flight when served gives me the best fit on my string nocks.

The extra 8 strands of B50 I twist into the string loops and splice would actually make 24 to 26 strands through the loops and splice. The extra strands are each cut to a different length so they taper into the splice as well. Like I mentioned prior, I like a squishy splice and extra bearing surface through the string nocks.

I don't use fast flight as a way to reduce string diameter. I go for the correct diameter to fit my nocks.

I like the way my bows feel when I shoot them with fast flight. I don't care about any gains in speed. Durability and dependability is what I want. I've slipped and cut strands before and with that many strands I can afford to loose a few.

On the subject of heavy arrows......My shafts are gold tip traditional spine 75/95. They are cut to 31 1/2# long. I do a cap wrap affair made up of pieces of cap wraps and often painting. 5 1/2" full helical leftwing with a shield shape off a feather burner. I use a dremel tool with a drum sander to remove the burn and soften the edges of the feather....(makes them quieter). My points are the biggest Magnus four blades with full size inserts. I put 70 grain steel threaded adaptors in the broad heads.

Entire arrow weight is just under 650 grains. I don't go heavier with point weight because the bare shafts fly just right with 200gr field points plus a couple steel washers for testing. That's pretty close to the 235 gr broad head weight. At any rate, I find that my setup works wet or dry for the type hunting I do.

I agree with you on not liking weight tubes. They sure do the job but for me it feels like I've taken the life out of my arrows. I feel like I'm shooting fish arrows. Unless they open a dangerous game season in Iowa I believe I will stick to my 650ish arrows.

.....Good luck!


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