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PostPosted: May 23rd, 2015, 7:38 am 
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With full disclosure up front, I am going to do an arrow build along in this thread with full intentions of having this build along, once complete, sent into Jack for inclusion in the PBS magazine (publishing it is their decision). My reasoning is I don't believe every member uses the website, and all of us should do what we can to reach everyone. So if you follow along here, thank you.

These arrows will be donated to the PBS Odd Year Gathering being held in Wisconsin this July.

Now, let's begin...

To start, I chose the best arrow shafts that I have been able to find, which for me is douglas fir made by Surewood Shafts in Oregon (your findings might be different, but I have tried all the wood materials that I could get my hands on, and these are what I choose to hunt with), It just so happens that the Surewood Guys are PBS members. Coincidence??? Nope, these are excellent shafts and even finer people. Fine examples of what's within the PBS.

These are going to be for the guys who like a heavy finished arrow weight...

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Last edited by Mike Vines on May 31st, 2015, 11:42 am, edited 2 times in total.

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PostPosted: May 23rd, 2015, 2:49 pm 
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I get out my very handy Woodchuck tapering tool and get to work...

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PostPosted: May 23rd, 2015, 2:50 pm 
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Point and Nock ends complete...

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PostPosted: May 23rd, 2015, 2:53 pm 
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I then get out some 100-120 grit sandpaper and soften the transition from shaft to tapers and then lighly sand the entire shaft to prepare for the finish...

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PostPosted: May 23rd, 2015, 2:56 pm 
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I line up all shafts the same way (nock on the left side here) and butt them up to a solid backstop to get them even...

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PostPosted: May 23rd, 2015, 3:01 pm 
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Using a square (framing square here because I couldn't find my small square in my meticulously clean work room), I figure where I want my transition from crown to foreshaft and Mark that location with a pencil...

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You are then left with this mark for reference...

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PostPosted: May 23rd, 2015, 3:05 pm 
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Using Minwax stain and a gun cleaning patch, along with protective gloves and a steady hand, I stain from the pencil mark down. Just take your time and work slowly....

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PostPosted: May 23rd, 2015, 3:09 pm 
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Once stained, set to the side to dry. At all levels of the arrow building process (when stuff has to dry), I prefer to wait a minimum of 24 hours before proceeding to the next step. That's how I was taught by PBS member, Ken Scollick, when he was instructing me, year's ago, on how to build arrows. It works for him just fine, so I see no need to change it.

Arrow building should be relaxing, not a rushed job, so de-stress yourself and enjoy the process. You are working with a small canvas, and you should take your time creating your finished product.

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That's it for today.


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PostPosted: May 24th, 2015, 6:49 am 
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Looking good, Mike!


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PostPosted: May 24th, 2015, 6:51 am 
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Thanks Bill, I've been watching what I eat and exercising more often. :lol: just kidding, thank you for the compliment.

Today's update will be on spraypainting the crown on the "deer" arrows once the humidity level comes down outside (read that as I don't want wet grass on my feet this morning).


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PostPosted: May 24th, 2015, 10:11 am 
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Remember the pencil mark I made yesterday to use as a reference to stop the stain? Today, I am using that same pencil mark as a reference to wrap my 2" blue painter's tape, so as not to get paint where it is not wanted...

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Last edited by Mike Vines on May 24th, 2015, 11:25 am, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: May 24th, 2015, 10:21 am 
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For my crown paint, I prefer to use spray paint. To me, there is less mess (when done outside---yes I tried it in the garage before and now have everything that was in there marked, so just incase it gets stolen, I can easily notice if it is mine when recovered. See, there is a positive in everything).

Using spray paint, you have the option of changing colors quickly without having to keep multiple dipping tubes filled with different colored paints.

When it comes to paint, this is the brand and type that I prefer.

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This type of paint does not dry quickly and allows the paint to "Flow" together for that flawless finish you are desiring but is not so easily atainable with a quick drying paint.

To further protect my stained shaft from over-spray, I wrap a piece of paper around the shaft and tape...

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Last edited by Mike Vines on May 24th, 2015, 10:51 am, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: May 24th, 2015, 10:26 am 
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Make sure when spraypainting that you are upwind from the work so as to protect your lungs and eyes.

Commence painting as you would anything else. Be cautious to keep the shaft moving and not to get the paint to thick on the shaft or you WILL have paint runs. Here is another place you want to slow down and relax so as to do a good job...

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PostPosted: May 24th, 2015, 10:31 am 
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Once the shafts are painted, I set them (painted side down) in my shop to dry. Make sure to remove your painter's tape at this point and you will be left with a clean and definitive transition point...

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Once all of the tape is removed, set to the side to dry (read the directions on the paint. These will sit for a minimum of 48 hours this time)...

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PostPosted: May 24th, 2015, 10:35 am 
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Here is a picture of my dipping station...

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PostPosted: May 24th, 2015, 10:47 am 
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While the "Deer" arrows are set to the side to dry, I can get to work,on the "Turkey" arrows.

For my first dip of clear coat (I use Parks Wood Floor finish, in gloss, bought from Home Depot), I prefer to dip nock end down. The reason why will be explained in coming installments...

Preparing to dip (small binder clip is clipped on the point end of the shaft and used to hold onto while dipping)

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Lifted from dip tube...

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What I like to do is let the finish run off the shaft back into the dip tube to save the finish to be used again. Once the stream of finish (you can see it in the picture) has turned into a "drip", that is when I place the shaft on the hanger...

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To catch the remaining finish that comes off of the shaft, I have a three foot long wallpaper tray on the floor for the finish to drip into (tray can be seen in the above picture).

All that is left now is to relax while everything dries, or you can get more chores done. All depends on how motivated you feel.


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PostPosted: May 25th, 2015, 7:00 pm 
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The Turkey arrows are dry, and it's raining out, so now is a good time to get to the next step.

In the picture below, I have my shaft that has a water-based finish applied, and 0000 steel wool. Now, the manufacturer says not to use steel wool in the process of using their product. I do not know if their disapproval of using steel wool is because of: the oil left on the product; afraid fibers will be left behind and rust on successive coats; or a whole host of different reasons, but I do know that I have close to 100 dozen arrows (and friends using the same product and process with many more sets under their belts) that have had ZERO problems and kill animals just fine by everyone who has used them. So, all that to say...follow the Manufacturer's directions, but do not be afraid to "experiment" to see what works for you.

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Now that the finish is roughed up with the steel wool, let's take a minute to talk about wood grain. From the below picture, you can see an excellent example of grain in wood shafting. The top shaft, to me, is the prettiest part of the wood. The bottom shaft shows the edge grain. The longer and straighter, and in my opinion, the more lines there are (which are the growth rings), the better the product.

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On baseball bats, the logo is always printed on the bat so that the edge grain (lower shaft in the picture) makes contact with the ball. The logo is printed the same on each bat, so the batter has a reference point (logo on top) so they are using the strongest part of the bat (edge grain) to contact the ball.

That will be useful information in the next segment about glueing on the nock.


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PostPosted: May 25th, 2015, 7:20 pm 
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Glueing on the nock...

A word to the wise, I have found out the hard way a few times in life, that all products are NOT compatible. Everything I am using in this build-along works together.

In the next picture, I have my shaft coated in Parks Wood Floor finish, Bohning Classic nock and Duco glue...

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PostPosted: May 25th, 2015, 7:38 pm 
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Now, my theory on wood grain and lining everything up for consistency, is to glue the nock on the shaft so that the edge grain will be sitting next to the shelf. my thoughts are very similar to wooden bat makers. I want the strongest side of the arrow flexing thru the Archer's Paradox. So lining up the grain similar to a baseball bat just makes sense to me.

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When I glue on the nock, I put a pea sized dab of Duco on the nock end of the shaft, put on the nock, twist it around 360° to spread the glue then I line up the nock to wood grain as pictured above. I push on the nock, run my finger around the nock where some of the glue has pushed out (to clean it off) and wipe my finger on a paper towel that I have ready for this purpose.

When I build arrows for myself, I use my spine tester to find the same spine # for each shaft (on the edge grain) with matching weight being within 5-10 grains. I do it only because I'm kinda anal when it comes to stuff being the same (thank you U.S. Army).

There are guys who say all of that doesn't matter, and they are probably correct, that is why some people paint the entire shaft and have no idea where the grain of the wood is running and their arrows fly just fine...to them.

To me, if I have the ability to do something that will eliminate a potential problem down the road, why not take the extra second of time to make everything uniform? To each their own.

That's it for today. Time to get ready for the work week ahead and life in general. I will update this thread as I proceed thru the processes. Thank you to those following along.


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PostPosted: May 25th, 2015, 8:17 pm 
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Mike , Thanks for building the arrows and getting this post started. I know they will generate a lot of interest at the "ODD YEAR", I for one will be looking forward to bidding on them.

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PostPosted: May 25th, 2015, 8:34 pm 
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Thank you Brian. The best thing a guy/gal can do for an organization they care for, is donate to it's future.

I also made a "Hobo" stove this weekend and gave it a trial run just to see how it would do. It was a winner. We will be taking one along to Canada on a family fishing trip/moose scouting trip this August for shore lunches, and I will be making another to donate to the OYG too, along with a box of wood to go along with it. The iron skillet filled with Bacon, mushroom and onions (steak toppings) will have to be supplied by the winner of the stove though. :D

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PostPosted: May 26th, 2015, 4:41 pm 
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Sure looks like it works great!
Thanks Again Mike!

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PostPosted: May 26th, 2015, 6:49 pm 
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Great thread Mike. It is very helpful. Can't wait to see the finished arrows.


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PostPosted: May 26th, 2015, 7:19 pm 
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Thank you For the compliments guys.

Tonight was an easy night. I dipped the Deer arrows to get them sealed (nock end down again for the first dip) same process as the Turkey arrows...

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PostPosted: May 26th, 2015, 7:26 pm 
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I then got out my assortment of feathers to get some ideas what I want to use for fletching and then thinking of a cresting color (s) to match. I'll admit I'm not the best at choosing colors, I usually ask my wife to help in that department...

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I then get the hankering to get fancy on the Deer arrows and bust these out in about 5 minutes...

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Once you do a few of these, they really are pretty simple. Its the first couple membrane splices you do that you learn. From there, it's simple.


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PostPosted: May 26th, 2015, 8:18 pm 
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These are going to be pretty nice when fletched up...

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That is it for this evening.


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PostPosted: May 27th, 2015, 2:09 am 
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Mike, that is one helluva 'arrow building tutorial'. Even in what you call your 'messy station', you have all of your ducks in a roll. Good for you.
Great job.
Shick


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PostPosted: May 27th, 2015, 5:51 pm 
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Alright, I came home tonight and the Kid's baseball game was cancelled due to more rain, so I got to work a bit more on the arrows.

I took the Deer arrows and steel wooled them and installed the nocks just as I did the Turkey arrows (didn't figure I needed to take pictures of the same procedures).

Then I got out my cresting machine. I use the Spinrite. It is the best crester I have personally used. You may find that your crester is perfect for you. Some might find that simply using a Sharpie magic marker does the trick for them. That's the best part of building your own stuff, you get to do it your way.

So anyway, as you can see in the below picture, someone came and dumped a garbage can on my bench, and more importantly...For consistency, I use a business card with measured out hash marks on it to lay out my cresting to be painted...

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Last edited by Mike Vines on May 27th, 2015, 6:21 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: May 27th, 2015, 6:04 pm 
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Here is a picture of the Deer arrows along with the type of paint I prefer to use which is Testors model car paint...

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PostPosted: May 27th, 2015, 6:06 pm 
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Here they are set in my drying rack. Can anyone figure out the signature on the arrow leaned up on the left side of the picture?...

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